Learning to use (and love) the Command Line

shell

Back to Snip <-- Previous Change | Next Change -->

Diff Summary
Title Learning to use (and love) the Command Line Learning to use (and love) the Command Line
Date 2010-07-18 02:14:01 2010-07-18 08:22:49
Editor serjant Gregor
Tags

2010-07-18 02:14:01 by serjant
2010-07-18 08:22:49 by Gregor
n1<div style="width: 650px; padding: 0pt 2em; marginn1<div style="left; width: 92%; padding: 0 2em; marg
>: 1em 0pt 2em 1em; border: 1px solid rgb(136, 136,>in: 1em 0 2em 1em; border: solid #888888 1px; back
> 136); background-color: rgb(224, 238, 238);"> >ground-color:#E0EEEE;">
2<br/>2<br>
3<br/><p>Everyone has heard about it, and most new 
>users dread it… the command line. However, it real 
>ly doesn't need to be so frightening. After you ge 
>t used to it, it really is a very useful tool. Bel 
>ow you will find a summary of many of the basic co 
>mmands you will need in order to use the command l 
>ine effectively.</p>  
4<br/>3<br>
5<p><strong>First, some background:</strong></p> 4<h1 id="toc0"><span><strong>Learning to use (and l
 >ove) the Command Line </strong></span></h1>
6<br/>
7<p>The Linux command line is much like DOS, except
> there are some very important differences. First, 
> it is case sensitive. In dos cd desktop and cd De 
>sktop did the same thing. In Linux, this is not th 
>e case. Your desktop folder is located at ~/Deskto 
>p, and if you type ~/desktop it will tell you the  
>folder does not exist. There are times when you mi 
>ght come into contact with capital letters, so be  
>aware.</p>  
8<p>Second, there are permissions to consider. You,
> as a normal user, are only allowed access to your 
> home folder (~, or /home/&lt;username&gt;). You c 
>an read, write and delete files to your hearts con 
>tent here (not that this is a good idea, but you c 
>an). Outside of this folder you need to use the ro 
>ot user to change anything. Basically, use the com 
>mand "su -" to switch to the root user. You will n 
>eed to enter the root password you created at inst 
>all. You now have the power to break your system,  
>so use it carefully. Only run commands as root if  
>you absolutely need to, to avoid the risk of break 
>ing stuff.</p>  
9<p>To get to the command line, there is an icon on
> the dock with a command prompt. Also, if you go t 
>o the menu, under System there is an entry for the 
> terminal. These are the "pretty" terminals with t 
>ransparency. For a simpler version (equally functi 
>onal, just more plain looking), use the terminal c 
>hoice at the top level of the menu, or pick xterm  
>under the System menu.</p>  
10<p>OK, time to learn some basic commands</p>
11<h1 id="toc0"><span><strong>su - Switch User &amp;
> Super User</strong></span></h1>  
12<p><strong>su</strong> is the switch user command.
> If you have multiple users you can switch between 
> them on the terminal with this command (note, thi 
>s does not affect your GUI session). If I have a u 
>ser "bob" that I want to switch to, I can use this 
> command to switch (assuming I have the password). 
> The exit command can be used to stop being that u 
>ser:</p>  
13<div id="code">
14<pre>
15[df4@localhost ~]$ su bob
16[root@localhost ~]# exit
17</pre></div>
185
n19<br> n
20And the video for this command:<br>
21<object width="425" height="350"><param value="htt
>p://www.youtube.com/v/nXOFpG1uh4I" name="movie">  
22<param value="transparent" name="wmode">
23<embed width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent
>" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http:/ 
>/www.youtube.com/v/nXOFpG1uh4I"></object>  
24<p>There are many cases where you need root permis
>sions to edit system files. In order to access the 
>se files, you need to be "root", or the admin user 
>. To switch to root, the best way to use this comm 
>and. It will send you to roots home folder (/root) 
> and give you roots commands (many of which are un 
>available to normal users for security reasons). A 
>gain, the exit command returns you to your normal  
>user:</p>  
25<div id="code">
26<pre>
27[df4@localhost ~]$ su -
28[root@localhost ~]# exit
29</pre></div>
30<p>Another use of the "su" command is a more tempo
>rary "su -c". This runs only the single command yo 
>u specify as the superuser, then returns you to yo 
>ur normal prompt:</p>  
31<div id="code">
32<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ su -c 'apt-get install ati
>'  
33</pre></div>
34<h1 id="toc1"><span><strong>ls - List</strong></sp
>an></h1>  
35<p><strong>ls</strong> (1) is the basic command to
> list all the files in a directory. It is a rough  
>equivelent of the DOS command dir, but much more p 
>owerful. By itself it lists the files in the direc 
>tory you are currently in, however if you append a 
> directory after it (2) it will list the files the 
>re. There are many extra options you can pass with 
> the ls command. Some common ones are -a and -l, o 
>ften combined as ls -al (3). ls -a shows all files 
> (including hidden files) and -l shows more info a 
>bout the files (owner, permissions, etc.). For a f 
>ull listing of all options available with the ls c 
>ommand, type ls &mdash;help (4).</p>  
36<p>(1)</p>
37<div id="code">
38<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ ls
39Desktop/               irc_minutes.odt   Screensho
>t.png          wallpaper/  
40eosking_backpaper.gif  Screenshot-1.png  Swiftfox_
>wallpaper.png  
41install-swiftfox.sh*   Screenshot-2.png  tmp/
42</pre></div>
43<p>(2)</p>
44<div id="code">
45<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ ls /opt
46firefox/  swiftfox/  thunderbird/
47</pre></div>
48<p>(3)</p>
49<div id="code">
50<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ ls -al
51total 3156
52drwxr-xr-x 38 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:25 ./
53drwxr-xr-x  3 root root   4096 Apr 16 02:32 ../
54drwx------  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 16:33 .AbiSu
>ite/  
55-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4       0 Apr 16 02:32 .adesk
>lets  
56-rw-------  1 df4  df4     547 Apr 19 14:18 .bash_
>history  
57-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4      24 Apr 16 02:31 .bash_
>logout  
58-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4     376 Apr 16 02:31 .bash_
>profile  
59-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4     124 Apr 16 02:31 .bashr
>c  
60drwx------  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:59 .bcast
>/  
61drwxr-xr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:25 .beryl
>/  
62-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4     187 Apr 19 14:25 .beryl
>-managerrc  
63drwx------  5 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 13:08 .cache
>/  
64drwxrwxr-x  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:34 .coder
>ed/  
65drwx------  9 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 15:50 .confi
>g/  
66drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:37 .cube/
>  
67drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:31 .daypl
>anner/  
68drwxr-xr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:31 .deskl
>ets/  
69drwxr-xr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 13:25 Deskto
>p/  
70-rw-------  1 df4  df4      26 Apr 16 02:31 .dmrc
71drwxr-xr-x  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 19:29 .emera
>ld/  
72-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4    2020 Apr 18 17:48 eoskin
>g_backpaper.gif  
73drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 17:03 .fontc
>onfig/  
74-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4     516 Apr 16 02:31 .fonts
>.conf  
75drwxrwxr-x  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 13:28 .fullc
>ircle/  
76drwx------  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:03 .gaim/
>  
77drwx------  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:25 .gconf
>/  
78drwx------  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:30 .gconf
>d/  
79-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4     419 Apr 18 17:18 .glade
>2  
80drwx------  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:13 .gnome
>2/  
81drwx------  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:32 .gnome
>2_private/  
82drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 22:04 .gstre
>amer-0.10/  
83-rw-------  1 df4  df4       0 Apr 16 02:31 .gtk-b
>ookmarks  
84-rw-------  1 df4  df4    2310 Apr 19 14:25 .ICEau
>thority  
85drwxr-xr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:54 .icons
>/  
86-rwxrwxr-x  1 df4  df4    1279 Mar 21 16:20 instal
>l-swiftfox.sh*  
87-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4    9668 Apr 18 16:34 irc_mi
>nutes.odt  
88drwx------  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:37 .kde/
89drwxrwxr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:32 .local
>/  
90drwx------  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 15:56 .macro
>media/  
91drwxr-xr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:37 .mcop/
>  
92-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4       0 Apr 16 02:32 .mdk-m
>enu-migrated  
93drwx------  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 13:08 .mozil
>la/  
94drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 15:44 .mplay
>er/  
95-rwxrwxr-x  1 df4  df4      18 Apr 16 02:34 .net_m
>onitorrc*  
96drwxrwxr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 19:52 .nvu/
97-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4    1624 Apr 19 13:05 .recen
>tly-used.xbel  
98-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4  807839 Apr 18 15:36 Screen
>shot-1.png  
99-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4  807283 Apr 18 17:11 Screen
>shot-2.png  
100-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4  389480 Apr 18 15:33 Screen
>shot.png  
101drwxr-x---  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 15:27 .sodip
>odi/  
102-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4  957970 Apr 18 15:04 Swiftf
>ox_wallpaper.png  
103drwxrwxr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:58 .theme
>s/  
104drwxrwxr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 17 13:09 .thumb
>nails/  
105drwx------  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 13:08 .thund
>erbird/  
106drwxr-xr-x  3 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:31 .tilda
>/  
107drwx------  6 df4  df4    4096 Apr 19 14:30 tmp/
108drwxrwxr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 15:04 wallpa
>per/  
109-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4    1185 Apr 19 13:07 .wbar
110drwxr-xr-x  2 df4  df4    4096 Apr 16 02:31 .Wbar/
>  
111-rw-------  1 df4  df4       0 Apr 18 18:03 .Xauth
>ority  
112drwx------  4 df4  df4    4096 Apr 18 17:34 .xchat
>2/  
113-rw-rw-r--  1 df4  df4    7062 Apr 16 02:31 .xscre
>ensaver  
114-rw-r--r--  1 df4  df4    5192 Apr 19 14:31 .xsess
>ion-errors  
115</pre></div>
116<p>(4)</p>
117<div id="code">
118<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ ls --help
119Usage: ls [ OPTION ]... [ FILE ]...
120List information about the FILEs (the current dire
>ctory by default).  
121Sort entries alphabetically if none of -cftuvSUX n
>or --sort.  
1226
n123Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory n7<p>Everyone has heard about it, and most new users
>for short options too. > dread it… the command line. However, it really do
 >esn't need to be so frightening. After you get use
 >d to it, it really is a very useful tool. Below yo
 >u will find a summary of many of the basic command
 >s you will need in order to use the command line e
 >ffectively.</p>
124  -a, --all                  do not ignore entries
> starting with .  
125  -A, --almost-all           do not list implied .
> and ..  
126      --author               with -l, print the au
>thor of each file  
127  -b, --escape               print octal escapes f
>or nongraphic characters  
128      --block-size=SIZE      use SIZE-byte blocks
129  -B, --ignore-backups       do not list implied e
>ntries ending with ~  
130  -c                         with -lt: sort by, an
>d show, ctime (time of last  
131                               modification of fil
>e status information)  
132                               with -l: show ctime
> and sort by name  
133                               otherwise: sort by 
>ctime  
134  -C                         list entries by colum
>ns  
135      --color[=WHEN]         control whether color
> is used to distinguish file  
136                               types.  WHEN may be
> 'never', 'always', or 'auto'  
137  -d, --directory            list directory entrie
>s instead of contents,  
138                               and do not derefere
>nce symbolic links  
139  -D, --dired                generate output desig
>ned for Emacs' dired mode  
140  -f                         do not sort, enable -
>aU, disable -lst  
141  -F, --classify             append indicator (one
> of */=&gt;@|) to entries  
142      --file-type            likewise, except do n
>ot append '*'  
143      --format=WORD          across -x, commas -m,
> horizontal -x, long -l,  
144                               single-column -1, v
>erbose -l, vertical -C  
145      --full-time            like -l --time-style=
>full-iso  
146  -g                         like -l, but do not l
>ist owner  
147  -G, --no-group             like -l, but do not l
>ist group  
148  -h, --human-readable       with -l, print sizes 
>in human readable format  
149                               (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)
150      --si                   likewise, but use pow
>ers of 1000 not 1024  
151  -H, --dereference-command-line
152                             follow symbolic links
> listed on the command line  
153      --dereference-command-line-symlink-to-dir
154                             follow each command l
>ine symbolic link  
155                             that points to a dire
>ctory  
156      --hide=PATTERN         do not list implied e
>ntries matching shell PATTERN  
157                               (overridden by -a o
>r -A)  
158      --indicator-style=WORD append indicator with
> style WORD to entry names:  
159                               none (default), sla
>sh (-p),  
160                               file-type (--file-t
>ype), classify (-F)  
161  -i, --inode                with -l, print the in
>dex number of each file  
162  -I, --ignore=PATTERN       do not list implied e
>ntries matching shell PATTERN  
163  -k                         like --block-size=1K
164  -l                         use a long listing fo
>rmat  
165  -L, --dereference          when showing file inf
>ormation for a symbolic  
166                               link, show informat
>ion for the file the link  
167                               references rather t
>han for the link itself  
168  -m                         fill width with a com
>ma separated list of entries  
169  -n, --numeric-uid-gid      like -l, but list num
>eric user and group IDs  
170  -N, --literal              print raw entry names
> (don't treat e.g. control  
171                               characters speciall
>y)  
172  -o                         like -l, but do not l
>ist group information  
173  -p, --indicator-style=slash
174                             append / indicator to
> directories  
175  -q, --hide-control-chars   print ? instead of no
>n graphic characters  
176      --show-control-chars   show non graphic char
>acters as-is (default  
177                             unless program is 'ls
>' and output is a terminal)  
178  -Q, --quote-name           enclose entry names i
>n double quotes  
179      --quoting-style=WORD   use quoting style WOR
>D for entry names:  
180                               literal, locale, sh
>ell, shell-always, c, escape  
181  -r, --reverse              reverse order while s
>orting  
182  -R, --recursive            list subdirectories r
>ecursively  
183  -s, --size                 with -l, print size o
>f each file, in blocks  
184  -S                         sort by file size
185      --sort=WORD            extension -X, none -U
>, size -S, time -t,  
186                             version -v, status -c
>, time -t, atime -u,  
187                             access -u, use -u
188      --time=WORD            with -l, show time as
> WORD instead of modification  
189                             time: atime, access, 
>use, ctime or status; use  
190                             specified time as sor
>t key if --sort=time  
191      --time-style=STYLE     with -l, show times u
>sing style STYLE:  
192                             full-iso, long-iso, i
>so, locale, +FORMAT.  
193                             FORMAT is interpreted
> like 'date'; if FORMAT is  
194                             FORMAT1&lt;newline&gt
>;FORMAT2, FORMAT1 applies to  
195                             non-recent files and 
>FORMAT2 to recent files;  
196                             if STYLE is prefixed 
>with `posix-', STYLE  
197                             takes effect only out
>side the POSIX locale  
198  -t                         sort by modification 
>time  
199  -T, --tabsize=COLS         assume tab stops at e
>ach COLS instead of 8  
200  -u                         with -lt: sort by, an
>d show, access time  
201                               with -l: show acces
>s time and sort by name  
202                               otherwise: sort by 
>access time  
203  -U                         do not sort; list ent
>ries in directory order  
204  -v                         sort by version
205  -w, --width=COLS           assume screen width i
>nstead of current value  
206  -x                         list entries by lines
> instead of by columns  
207  -X                         sort alphabetically b
>y entry extension  
208  -1                         list one file per lin
>e  
209      --help     display this help and exit
210      --version  output version information and ex
>it  
2118
n212SIZE may be (or may be an integer optionally follon9<a href="http://www.sam-linux.org">http://samity.o
>wed by) one of following: >rg</a>.<br />
213kB 1000, K 1024, MB 1000*1000, M 1024*1024, and so10<a href="http://www.sam-linux.org">http://samity.o
> on for G, T, P, E, Z, Y. >rg</a>.<br />
11<a href="http://www.sam-linux.org">http://samity.o
 >rg</a>.<br />
12<a href="http://www.sam-linux.org">http://samity.o
 >rg</a>.<br />
21413
n215By default, color is not used to distinguish typesn14<p><strong>First, some background:</strong><br />
> of files.  That is  
216equivalent to using --color=none.  Using the --col
>or option without the  
217optional WHEN argument is equivalent to using --co
>lor=always.  With  
218--color=auto, color codes are output only if stand
>ard output is connected  
219to a terminal (tty).  The environment variable LS_
>COLORS can influence the  
220colors, and can be set easily by the dircolors com
>mand.  
22115
n222Exit status is 0 if OK, 1 if minor problems, 2 if n16<p>The Linux command line is much like DOS, except
>serious trouble. > there are some very important differences. First,
 > it is case sensitive. In dos cd desktop and cd De
 >sktop did the same thing. In Linux, this is not th
 >e case. Your desktop folder is located at ~/Deskto
 >p, and if you type ~/desktop it will tell you the 
 >folder does not exist. There are times when you mi
 >ght come into contact with capital letters, so be 
 >aware.
22317
n224Report bugs to &lt;bug-coreutils@gnu.org&gt;. n18Second, there are permissions to consider. You, as
 > a normal user, are only allowed access to your ho
 >me folder (~, or /home/<username>). You can read, 
 >write and delete files to your hearts content here
 > (not that this is a good idea, but you can). Outs
 >ide of this folder you need to use the root user t
 >o change anything. Basically, use the command "su 
 >-" to switch to the root user. You will need to en
 >ter the root password you created at install. You 
 >now have the power to break your system, so use it
 > carefully. Only run commands as root if you absol
 >utely need to, to avoid the risk of breaking stuff
 >.
225</pre></div>
226<h1 id="toc2"><span><strong>cd - Change Directory<
>/strong></span></h1>  
227<p><strong>cd</strong> is the command to change di
>rectory. It is very much similar to the DOS comman 
>d by the same name. To use it, type the name of th 
>e directory you want to go to. For example, if I a 
>m at my home folder (~), I can type this to get th 
>ere, because Desktop is a subfolder of the home fo 
>lder (as I saw by typing ls above):</p>  
228<div id="code">
229<pre>[df4@localhost ~]$ cd Desktop
230</pre></div>
231<p>Lets say I am in the home folder and I want to 
>go to the /opt folder. In this case, I need the wh 
>ole path, as /opt is not a subfolder of my home fo 
>lder:</p>  
232<div id="code">
233<pre>
234[df4@localhost ~]$ cd /opt
235</pre></div>
236<p>Finally, if I want to go up a folder, there is 
>a shortcut. It is similar to DOS, but in DOS there 
> is no space:</p>  
237<div id="code">
238<pre>
239[df4@localhost ~]$ cd ..
240</pre></div>
241<h1 id="toc3"><span><strong>cp - Copy</strong></sp
>an></h1>  
242<p><strong>cp</strong> is used to copy a file. It 
>is often used to create backups of config files be 
>fore you edit them, or move a folder while leaving 
> the original. Lets say I want to make a copy of t 
>he file /boot/grub/menu.lst. I have two options. F 
>irst, I could cd to the directory then make the ch 
>ange:</p>  
243<div id="code">
244<pre>
245[df4@localhost ~]$ su -
246[root@localhost ~]# cd /boot/grub
247[root@localhost ~]# cp menu.lst menu.lst.backup
248</pre></div>
249<p>Note that I needed to become root to edit anyth
>ing in /boot since it is not in my home folder. No 
>w this is how I could do it in one command:</p>  
250<div id="code">
251<pre>
252[df4@localhost ~]$su -
253[root@localhost ~]# cp /boot/grub/menu.lst /boot/g
>rub/menu.lst.backup  
254[root@localhost ~]# exit
255</pre></div>
256<h1 id="toc4"><span><strong>ln - Link</strong></sp
>an></h1>  
257<p><strong>ln</strong> is the command used to crea
>te links. It is very useful when you want a file t 
>o be available in several places but with only one 
> version. You can link to directories or single fi 
>les. Typically you use what are called "symbolic l 
>inks". These "symbolic links" are created by using 
> "ln -s", followed by the file that you are linkin 
>g, and the path that it is being linked to. Note t 
>hat you cannot make a link to a link, you must lin 
>k to the original file/directory. A common applica 
>tion of a link is to enable plugins in multiple br 
>owsers. Below is an example of linking the flash p 
>lugin in my firefox plugins folder to "swiftfox" w 
>hich I have installed:</p>  
258<div id="code">
259<pre>
260[df4@localhost ~]$ su -
261[root@localhost ~]# ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins
>/libflashplayer.so /opt/swiftfox/plugins/  
262[root@localhost ~]# exit
263</pre></div>
264<h1 id="toc5"><span><strong>mv - Move</strong></sp
>an></h1>  
265<p><strong>mv</strong> is the command used to move
> a file or a directory. To move a file, you simply 
> use mv, followed by the file, followed by the pla 
>ce you want to move it to. In this example I am mo 
>ving my recently downloaded Fedora 7 Test 4 disk i 
>mage from the desktop to my home folder:</p>  
266<div id="code">
267<pre>
268[df4@localhost ~]$ mv ~/Desktop/F-6.93-i386-DVD.is
>o ~/  
269</pre></div>
270<h1 id="toc6"><span><strong>rm - Remove/Delete</st
>rong></span></h1>  
271<p><strong>rm</strong> is the command to delete fr
>om the command line. This is a very dangerous comm 
>and and should be used sparingly, as once a file i 
>s deleted by rm there is no way to recover it. Her 
>e I will delete the iso file from above using rm:< 
>/p>  
272<div id="code">
273<pre>
274[df4@localhost ~]$ rm ~/F-6.93-i386-DVD.iso</code>
>  
275</pre></div>
276<p>To delete a folder, use the tag "-r" for recurs
>ive. Here I will delete a folder called Pictures o 
>n my desktop:</p>  
277<div id="code">
278<pre>
279[df4@localhost ~]$rm -r ~/Desktop/Pictures
280</pre></div>
281<h1 id="toc7"><span><strong>pwd - Print Working Di
>rectory</strong></span></h1>  
282<p><strong>pwd</strong> stands for "print working 
>directory", and it does just that. It prints the l 
>ocation you are currently in. Here is what happens 
> when I type pwd from my home folder:</p>  
283<div id="code">
284<pre>
285[df4@localhost ~]$ pwd
286/home/df4
287</pre></div>
288<h1 id="toc8"><span><strong>mkdir - Make a Directo
>ry</strong></span></h1>  
289<p><strong>mkdir</strong> is the command you would
> use to create a new folder. You need to specify t 
>he path and name of the folder. If I wanted to cre 
>ate a new folder on my desktop called pictures, it 
> would look like this:</p>  
290<div id="code">
291<pre>
292[df4@localhost ~]$ mkdir ~/Desktop/Pictures
293</pre></div>
294<h1 id="toc9"><span><strong>mount - Mount a Drive<
>/strong></span></h1>  
295<p><strong>mount</strong> is a command that lets y
>ou access new hard drives or partitions on your sy 
>stem (including flash drives that are not automati 
>cally recognized). In this most common use, I am m 
>ounting a drive that has another linux OS on it:</ 
>p>  
296<p>First, I need to know what the partition is cal
>led, so I run this:</p>  
297<div id="code">
298<pre>
299[df4@localhost ~]$ su -
300Password: 
301[root@localhost ~]# fdisk -l
30219
n303Disk /dev/sda: 81.9 GB, 81964302336 bytes n20To get to the command line, there is an icon on th
 >e dock with a command prompt. Also, if you go to t
 >he menu, under System there is an entry for the te
 >rminal. These are the "pretty" terminals with tran
 >sparency. For a simpler version (equally functiona
 >l, just more plain looking), use the terminal choi
 >ce at the top level of the menu, or pick xterm und
 >er the System menu.
304255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9964 cylinders
305Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
30621
n307   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks n22OK, time to learn some basic commands.</p>
>  Id  System  
308/dev/sda1               1        2490    20000893+
>  83  Linux  
309/dev/sda2            2491        4980    20000925 
>  83  Linux  
310/dev/sda3   *        4981        7412    19535040 
>  83  Linux  
311/dev/sda4            7413        9964    20498940 
>   5  Extended  
312/dev/sda5            7413        9819    19334196 
>  83  Linux  
313/dev/sda6            9820        9964     1164681 
>  82  Linux swap / Solaris  
314</pre></div>
315<p>Now say I want to mount the first partition, wh
>ich is identified as /dev/sda1. First I need to cr 
>eate a mount point (just a folder I will access th 
>e drive through). The usual places for this are in 
> /media and /mnt. Either is equally acceptable. Th 
>en use the mount command to mount the drive, the c 
>d to the directory to browse its contents:</p>  
316<div id="code">
317<pre>
318[root@localhost ~]# mkdir /media/sda1
319[root@localhost ~]# mount /dev/sda1 /media/sda1
320[root@localhost ~]# cd /media/sda1
321</pre></div>
322<p>If I were mounting a windows partition, the ste
>ps would basically be the same, except the mount c 
>ommand would look different. Windows NTFS partitio 
>ns can be mounted as ntfs, which only allows readi 
>ng of the files, not writing, or as ntfs-3g, which 
> alows you to change the files. To use ntfs-3g, us 
>e the -t flag in order to specify the file system  
>type:</p>  
323<div id="code">
324<pre>
325[root@localhost ~]# mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /me
>dia/sda1  
326</pre></div>
327<p>Finally, if you want to mount all the file syst
>ems listed in your /etc/fstab file (*INSERT LINK T 
>O FSTAB PAGE HERE*), use the -a flag:</p>  
328<div id="code">
329<pre>
330[root@localhost ~]# mount -a
331</pre></div>
332<h1 id="toc10"><span><strong>locate - A File Searc
>h</strong></span></h1>  
333<p><strong>locate</strong> is used to find a file 
>anywhere on your system. If I want to find any fla 
>shplayer on my system, I could search with the loc 
>ate command like this:</p>  
334<div id="code">
335<pre>
336[df4@localhost ~]$ locate libflashplayer.so
337/opt/swiftfox/plugins/libflashplayer.so
338/usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so
339</pre></div>
340<p>The system keeps a database of the files on the
> system. If you are looking for a file that you ha 
>ve recently added, it might not have been updated  
>recently. Type this to fix this (might take some t 
>ime):</p>  
341<div id="code">
342<pre>updatedb
343</pre></div>
344<h1 id="toc11"><span><strong>chmod - Change Permis
>sions</strong></span></h1>  
345<p><strong>chmod</strong> is used to change the pe
>rmissions of a file. This is a very complicated co 
>mmand. This link will explain it better than I can 
>: <a href="http://catcode.com/teachmod/">http://ca 
>tcode.com/teachmod/</a> . 90% of the time you will 
> be using this command to make a file executable.  
>In this example, I am making a script I made calle 
>d EasySAMity executable:</p>  
346<div id="code">
347<pre># chmod +x ~/Desktop/EasySAMity
348</pre></div>
349<br>
350And the video presentation of the command:
351<p><object width="425" height="350"><param value="
>http://www.youtube.com/v/FiXZ_wObsuU" name="movie" 
>>  
352<param value="transparent" name="wmode">
353<embed width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent
>" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http:/ 
>/www.youtube.com/v/FiXZ_wObsuU"></object></p>  
354<h1 id="toc12"><span><strong>chown - Change Owner<
>/strong></span></h1>  
355<p><strong>chown</strong> is used to change the ow
>nership of a file or folder. If I want to change t 
>he folder /media/sda1 from above to my own user so 
> I can edit that drive without root permissions, I 
> would issue the chown command, with the -R flag ( 
>recursive) so it affects all subdirectories as wel 
>l:</p>  
356<div id="code">
357<pre>chown -R df4 /media/sda1
358</pre></div>
359<h1 id="toc13"><span><strong>top - A System Monito
>r</strong></span></h1>  
360<p><strong>top</strong> is used to launch a comman
>d line system processes monitor. It updates freque 
>ntly and is quite powerful:</p>  
361<div id="code">
362<pre>
363[df4@localhost ~]$ top
364top - 06:08:28 up 1 day,  8:48,  2 users,  load av
>erage: 0.06, 0.08, 0.08  
365Tasks: 102 total,   1 running, 101 sleeping,   0 s
>topped,   0 zombie  
366Cpu(s):  0.8% us,  0.2% sy,  0.0% ni, 98.5% id,  0
>.0% wa,  0.3% hi,  0.2% si  
367Mem:   1035740k total,   993028k used,    42712k f
>ree,    89712k buffers  
368Swap:  1164672k total,       44k used,  1164628k f
>ree,   649108k cached  
36923
n370  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEMn24<p><strong>su - Switch User & Super User</strong><
>    TIME+  COMMAND             >br />
37115081 df4       15   0  202m  91m  21m S    1  9.1
>   7:44.85 mozilla-firefox      
37214426 root      15   0 86024  46m  10m S    0  4.6
>  82:55.41 Xorg                 
37314654 df4       16   0  6588 4692 2224 S    0  0.5
>   1:37.23 python               
37420558 df4       15   0 25412  13m 8160 S    0  1.4
>   0:01.10 terminal             
37520681 df4       15   0  2072 1080  832 R    0  0.1
>   0:00.03 top                  
376    1 root      15   0  1568  536  468 S    0  0.1
>   0:01.41 init                 
377    2 root      RT   0     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.01 migration/0          
378    3 root      34  19     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 ksoftirqd/0          
379    4 root      RT   0     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 watchdog/0           
380    5 root      RT   0     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.11 migration/1          
381    6 root      34  19     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 ksoftirqd/1          
382    7 root      RT   0     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 watchdog/1           
383    8 root      10  -5     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:02.18 events/0             
384    9 root      10  -5     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.23 events/1             
385   10 root      10  -5     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 khelper              
386   11 root      12  -5     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.00 kthread              
387   35 root      10  -5     0    0    0 S    0  0.0
>   0:00.01 kblockd/0  
388</pre></div>
389<p>I can quit the screen by pressing 'q'. I can al
>so enter a mode to kill processes by hitting 'k',  
>then using the PID number next to each process to  
>kill it.</p>  
390<h1 id="toc14"><span><strong>Launching Programs</s
>trong></span></h1>  
391<p>In order to <strong>launch a program</strong> f
>rom the terminal, you need to type its name. Thats 
> it. Well, mostly. As long as it was installed fro 
>m the repositories (through synaptic or apt-get),  
>the command will be placed in /usr/bin. Any comman 
>d in /usr/bin can be launched by just typing the n 
>ame, and the computer just assumes the /usr/bin:</ 
>p>  
392<div id="code">
393<pre>
394[df4@localhost ~]$ firefox
395</pre></div>
396<p>If the app you want to launch is in another fol
>der (say, /opt/swiftfox) then you need the full pa 
>th to the executable:</p>  
397<div id="code">
398<pre>
399[df4@localhost ~]$ /opt/swiftfox/swiftfox
400</pre></div>
401<p>Finally, if you are in the directory of the pro
>gram, use ./ to launch it. The ./ means the curren 
>t directory. You can't just type the name, because 
> the computer assumes that means /usr/bin. Example 
> launching swiftfox as above:</p>  
402<div id="code">
403<pre>
404[df4@localhost ~]$ cd /opt/swiftfox
405[df4@localhost ~]$ ./swiftfox
406</pre></div>
40725
t408</div>t26<p>su is the switch user command. If you have mult
 >iple users you can switch between them on the term
 >inal with this command (note, this does not affect
 > your GUI session). If I have a user "bob" that I 
 >want to switch to, I can use this command to switc
 >h (assuming I have the password). The exit command
 > can be used to stop being that user:</p>
27

No users online



Google Search Engine